The exit interview can be a powerful tool in your organization if implemented and executed properly. The knowledge gained through them can help you to improve morale, reduce turnover, and even make better hires. There are a few general rules to keep in mind. First, never use an exit interview to attempt to change the employee’s mind. If they have become dissatisfied with their job you will not change that in a 30-minute meeting. Next, always have someone other than the employee’s direct manager conduct the interview. The objective is to set the employee at ease and get honest, objective responses. Finally, ensure the employee that all the data collected during exit interviews are anonymous and confidential.

Now that you know the broad ground rules, what kind of questions should you ask? Before you develop specific questions, you should define your objectives. These may vary depending on specific circumstances surrounding the resignation. For example, you will likely seek different information from an employee who was in good standing and resigned for a positive reason. Make an exhaustive list of master questions. Then select 10 – 15 from this list to customize each interview based on your objectives. Here are several sample questions to get you started.

What prompted you to begin looking for a new job outside of the company?

Did management provide you with adequate training and resources to effectively complete your job duties here? Why?

How were you treated by your direct manager?

How did your colleagues treat you?

How would you describe opportunities for advancement within our company?

What did you like best about your career here?

What did you like least about working here?

If a friend told you they were coming to work for our company, what would you tell them about working here?

How would you describe worker morale in your department?

If you were the manager, what would you do to improve morale?

Describe to me the perfect candidate to fill your position.

Were your contributions recognized and appreciated by management? Explain.

What advice would you give your replacement on their first day on the job?

What are you most excited about at your new job?

Your specific knowledge will allow you to develop more of a granular line of questioning. Remember to keep the atmosphere relaxed and informal, and always in a private place. After you have gone through all your questions, offer the employee a chance to add anything else they would like to discuss. Then, thank them sincerely. They may have provided you with the information you need to improve your hiring and retention metrics.

 

Danielle Foppe is a Recruitment Manager at Business Centric Technology. If you are interested in learning more about how to get the best IT talent in the Dallas metroplex, contact Danielle specializes in recruiting IT talent in Dallas, Ft. Worth and North Texas. If you are looking for a rewarding career contact us today.