You’ve worked hard and finally scored that interview. Now you are preparing for the barrage of questions that will come your way. What are your strengths? What are your weaknesses? Where do you see yourself in five years? And so on… It’s very important that you are prepared to answer the tough questions confidently, but it’s also important that you prepare to ask a few questions yourself. After all, you are potentially preparing to enter into a relationship that will occupy most of your waking hours. Just as the company needs for you to be a good fit, you need the company to sync up to your lifestyle and expectations. Depending on the position, company, etc. the appropriate questions will vary. That being said, here are five that you should seriously consider asking.

Can you tell me about your company’s culture?

As I mentioned above, if you accept this position you’ll likely spend a huge chunk of your life there. Before making a decision of this magnitude you should have a good understanding of the culture. What is a typical day like? How do coworkers get along and interact? How are management relations? What value does the employer place on their team members? If you plan on spending thousands of hours per year working at a place, you should at the very least feel comfortable there.

What types of advancement opportunities and professional development does your company provide?

You became an IT professional because you wanted a career, not just a job. Every position you accept should build on your prior experience and prepare you for the future.

How do you approach your team’s work-life balance?

An employer who is hiring with a focus on long-term success will understand that their success depends on the success of their staff, and that includes work-life balance. Employees who feel empowered not only to perform their professional duties, but manage their personal lives are more motivated in their positions.

Can you give me an example of how you have empowered your employees to perform their jobs?

Just like in your personal life, professional empowerment instills confidence and competence. Working in a micromanagement environment can be toxic to your career.

If I’m applying for a position to replace someone, can you tell me why they left?

It’s good to know why the position is open. Perhaps the company is expanding, or the former staffer was promoted. Or, could this be a dead-end position with no future opportunities? It’s best to ask and have a clear understanding of why the position is available.

Most of all remember that an interview is a two-way conversation. While you will be answering most of the questions you should always ask some of your own.

Danielle Foppe is a Recruitment Manager at Business Centric Technology. If you are interested in learning more about how to get the best IT talent in the Dallas metroplex, contact Danielle specializes in recruiting IT talent in Dallas, Ft. Worth and North Texas. If you are looking for a rewarding career contact us today.